Eggs-Ellent Eco-Easter Tips

As Easter fast approaches I can’t help but think, not of all that yummy chocolate, but all the unnecessary packaging that comes along with it, and all the waste going to landfill associated with another seasonal celebration. And this is only the waste that we can physically see.Eggs Easter Poster

Canadians consume an average of 5.5 kg of chocolate per person each year. Doesn’t sound like much but when you learn that it takes a full annual harvest from one cocoa tree to produce one tin of baking cocoa (http://fairtrade.ca/en/products/cocoa), it’s even more reason to appreciate every yummy bite of chocolate and consider your purchasing choices.

Here are a few simple ways (can you think of some others?) to
try to celebrate Easter in a more sustainable style:

   Place Fairtrade chocolate on the top of your shopping list. Not only does it help improve the living standards of cocoa farmers in the developing world, fostering a better future for their families and communities, but in addition, the environmental standards restrict the use of agrochemicals and encourage sustainability. Use the Fairtrade website www.fairtrade.ca to locate stores selling Fairtrade chocolate in your local area (among many other items like sugar, tea and coffee).

   Choose eggs and products with zero packaging, recyclable packaging and if neither of those are available, choose minimal packaging. Check your local blue box program to familiarise yourself with what’s accepted in your recycling bin.

   Choose decorations that can be recycled after use, and even better – re-used (and eventually recycled). Or make your own decorations, such as decorating real chicken eggs (blow out the yolks and use them in cooking), as opposed to buying plastic eggs and decorations. Much more fun too!

   Shiny wrappers challenge – Although they come in a variety of colours and sizes, there’s only one way to dispose of Easter egg foil wrappers – and that’s to recycle them! You’re CHALLENGE, is to collect all your foil wrappers and bunch them into a ball. They’re too small and light to recycle on their own, but they can be recycled if bunched into a ball.

Feel free to download the poster for your own use Eggs-Ellent Eco-Easter Tips.

Adapted from www.planetark.org